Designing Urban Spaces for Visual Impact: Ancient Athens and Rome

By James Donald Ragsdale and Frances E. Brandau.

Published by The International Journal of Civic, Political, and Community Studies

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Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Ancient cities were designed with several controlling principles in mind, including especially the desire to have visual influence on their residents. This paper explores these controlling principles in the cases of ancient Athens and Rome. It sets forth a theory of visual semiotics and design elements as a basis for this exploration.

Keywords: Urban Design, Visual Persuasion, Athens, Rome

The International Journal of Civic, Political, and Community Studies, Volume 10, Issue 3, 2012, pp.51-58. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 281.355KB).

Dr. James Donald Ragsdale

Professor and Chair, Department of Communication Studies, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas, USA

James Donald Ragsdale is the author of four books on structures as visual persuasion, especially art museums of the US and Western Europe, and architecture in general. He is a professor of communication studies and chair of the department at Sam Houston State University. His primary area of specialty is the semiotics of visual communication.

Dr. Frances E. Brandau

Professor, Department of Communication Studies, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas, USA

Frances E. Brandau-Brown is professor of communication studies and graduate program director at Sam Houston State University. She is the author and co-author of a number of book chapters and journal publications on the subject of visual persuasion.