The Experience of Late Adolescents: Assertiveness in the Workplace

By Phillip Minnaar, Chris Myburgh and Marie Poggenpoel.

Published by The Humanities Collection

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

The process of emancipation of the late adolescent often evokes mixed feelings. This is especially true when late adolescents enter the workplace. They simultaneously look forward to and fear the responsibility of adulthood. As part of their acquiring independence, they criticise boundaries. This often results in conflict. They often present with open enmity towards other persons, especially those with authority in the workplace, and show poor problem-solving skills with superficial interpersonal and intrapersonal relationships. A qualitative, explorative and descriptive study concerning the experiences with regard to the assertiveness of late adolescents in the work environment was executed with the aid of scenarios. This research attempted to establish late adolescents’ experiences of their own assertiveness with superiors, peers and inferiors in the workplace. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and students from a vocational training college were invited to participate. It was found that late adolescents experience the workplace as exposing; that they experience emotional distress and an inability to communicate needs; that they are prone to blame and need to prove their innocence; that they experience being intimidated by superiors, which let them compromise their preferences and react by using aggressive language and behaviour. Cognitive mechanisms are used to gain control over the situation and they experience a need for psychological and physical distancing from the problem. Alternatively, they will consider resignation and start looking for another job. Guidelines to support late adolescents on entering the workplace will be presented.

Keywords: Late Adolescent, Assertiveness, Workplace, Emotional Distress, Coping Mechanisms

International Journal of the Humanities, Volume 9, Issue 6, pp.263-274. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 764.157KB).

Phillip Minnaar

Senior Lecturer, Solidarity, University of Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa

I am a senior lecturer at an Artisan-Training College, employed by the trade union Solidarity and HOD of the automotive and electrical departments. During my teaching career at a secondary school, I came to realize that I’m quite interested in the psychology of education and completed my honours and masters degrees in this field. Currently I have just begun my PhD and intend to develop a model to facilitate the self-worth of late adolescents who enter the workplace.

Prof. Chris Myburgh

Professor, Educational Psychology, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa

He is a tenured professor who has been employed at the University of Johannesburg for more than 25years. He is conducting qualitative and quantitative research. For the past 10 years he has been conducting research on “Aggression in secondary schools in Southern Africa”. He has supervised more than 200 completed doctoral and masters candidates were supervised. He has published nationally and internationally more than 100 peer reviewed articles. Presently he is a director of the International Institute for Qualitative Methodology at the University of Alberta, Canada. He serves on editorial boards, higher degree committees and ethics committees.

Prof. Marie Poggenpoel

Professor, Psychiatric Nursing Science, Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park, Gauteng, South Africa

She is a tenured professor who has been employed at the University of Johannesburg for more than 25years. She is conducting qualitative and quantitative research. For the past 10 years she has been conducting research on “Aggression in Secondary Schools in Southern Africa”. She has supervised more than 200 completed doctoral and masters candidates were supervised. She has published nationally and internationally more than 100 peer reviewed articles. Presently she is a director of the International Institute for Qualitative Methodology at the University of Alberta, Canada. She serves on editorial boards, higher degree committees and ethics committees.

Reviews:

There are currently no reviews of this product.

Write a Review